Category Archives: People

How Steve Jobs Masterfully Handled Criticism

“Mistakes will be made”

link to the original article

It’s 1997, and Steve Jobs has just returned to the company he was fired from 12 years before.

On stage at Apple’s World Wide Developers Conference, Jobs was holding a rare Q&A with developers when one audience member stood up and lobbed an insult at Jobs.

“Mr. Jobs, you’re a bright and influential man,” he starts out with a flat tone. The audience laughs in the pause.

“Here it comes,” Job responds with a smile.

“It’s sad and clear that on several counts you’ve discussed, you don’t know what you’re talking about. [Audience laughter]. I would like, for example, for you to express in clear terms how, say, Java and any of its incarnations addresses the ideas embodied in OpenDoc. And when you’re finished with that, perhaps you can tell us what you personally have been doing for the last seven years,” he says.

At that point, the audience fell quiet and someone is heard saying “Ouch.” (Jobs had spent the last seven years not at Apple.)

 

Jobs’ response in the five minutes that follows is a masterclass in how to gracefully turn an insult into an impromptu speech on vision.

First, Jobs politely responds.

“You know, you can please some of the people some of the time, but…,” Jobs paused. “One of the hardest things when you’re trying to effect change is that people like this gentleman are right in some areas.”

He acknowledges that there are things OpenDoc does that he’s not even familiar with, but that doesn’t stop him in planning Apple’s future.

“The hardest thing is: how does that fit in to a cohesive, larger vision, that’s going to allow you to sell 8 billion dollars, 10 billion dollars of product a year? And, one of the things I’ve always found is that you’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards for the technology.” You can’t start with the technology and try to figure out where you’re going to try to sell it. And I made this mistake probably more than anybody else in this room. And I got the scar tissue to prove it. And I know that it’s the case,” Jobs said.

“And as we have tried to come up with a strategy and a vision for Apple, it started with ‘What incredible benefits can we give to the customer? Where can we take the customer?’ Not starting with ‘Let’s sit down with the engineers and figure out what awesome technology we have and then how are we going to market that?’ And I think that’s the right path to take,” Jobs continued.

He apologizes for killing off some of the software, but passionately stands by his employees who were working hard to get Apple back to the place where he could hold up a box and people would go “Whoa! Yes!” and want it. (Think about what Apple events are like today.)

“Mistakes will be made, some people will be pissed off, some people will not know what they’re talking about, but I think it’s so much better than where things were not very long ago. And I think we’re going to get there,” Jobs concludes.

 

HASHT5 – Daming Hanash

So there’s this boygroup in the Philippines called HASHT5, why the additional T you ask? Maski sila hindi nila alam,  kidding.  According to this YouTube video, HASHT5 simply means Have A Successful Honor Talent, mejo nayanig ang mundo ko pero deadskin, ibigay kung san sila masaya. Watch the funny interview below, just glad na hinde pikon tong grupong to, kasi baka magsumbong sila sa leader ng sindikato nila pag napuno na sila sa pangaasar ng mga netizens.

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Speaking of pangaasar, I follow their FB group (oo, proud ako!) and mejo harsh na nakakatawa naman ang comment ng mga tao sa mga kaawa-awang batang mga ito, I’ll give you a some matitinding samples:

  1. Mag ingat po kayo sa taong to, pag nang snatch ng cellphone yan kasama charger.
  2. Kuya kayo ba yung nag bebenta ng second hand phone sa foot bridge ng sm north ? sagutin niyo tanong ko please
  3. Tandaan nyo pagmumukha ng mga to, pag nakasabay nyo sa jeep, bus, mrt o kahit sa elevator naku bumaba na kayo agad. Magpapasko na no. Aktibo sila mga ganitong panahon
  4. Mga tol pwede sali sa group nyu? Anu po requirements? \brgy.Clerance/\police.clerance/\NBI.CLERANCE/?
  5. Tangena naman oh. Wag gawing eyeliner ang uling
  6. Buti nlang naka free data ako, d ko makikita ang mga pagmumukha nyo
  7. Puta dancer daw eh. Yan yung bumato sa sasakyan ko sa cubao ilalim. Batang hamog
  8. Infairness ah ang pangit
  9. wala naman kayo ginagawa sakin, pero naiinis ako sa mga mukha nyo.

May mga nageffort pa talaga!  Look!

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Illuminati daw

Illuminati daw

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Well, live and let live.

Reblogged: How I Learned To Fall Asleep In 1 Under Minute

Sleepless and Stressed

It was the week before my best friend’s wedding, and my anxiety (nerves, plus excitement) had reached epic levels. I wasn’t sleeping, to say the least. Part of that had to do with the maid of honor speech I would be giving. I was terrified and could not shut my brain off to fall asleep at night.

After day three of lying awake until the wee hours of the night, I sheepishly admitted to her that I was too nervous to fall asleep, and she—the bride, who was sleeping like a baby the week before her own wedding—told me I needed to try the “4-7-8” breathing trick.

She happens to be a licensed wellness practitioner who studies meditation, stress, and breathing techniques, and told me it would change my life. You simply breathe in through your nose for four seconds, hold your breath for seven seconds, and exhale through your mouth for eight seconds. She explained that the studied combination of numbers has a chemical-like effect on our brains, and would slow my heart rate and soothe me right to sleep that night. “It works,” she told me. “It’s crazy.”

How it Works 

I couldn’t wait to put the trick to the test, and to my complete disbelief, I woke up the next morning unable to even remember getting to the eighth second of the exhale because it knocked me out that fast. For the next four nights leading up to the big day, even as my stress increased, I was able to fall asleep the minute I tried the 4-7-8 trick. I also used it to relax in the moments leading up to the speech.

When you feel stressed or anxious, adrenaline courses through your veins, your heart beats at a rapid rate, and your breathing becomes quick and shallow. So before I get into the specifics behind how the 4-7-8 breathing trick works, I wanted to explain in my own words what it feels like when you try it. To me, the effect of the breathing technique feels almost like a sedative drug, because in order to hold your breath for seven seconds and then to exhale for eight—when your breath is so shallow and short—your body is forcedto slow your heart rate. It has no choice. Holding your breath, and then slowly, deliberately exhaling for eight seconds, causes a chain reaction. It feels like going from a mad-dash sprint to a finish line to a slow, leisurely, calming stroll through the park.

When you first start, you’ll be desperate to just take in another breath, or you’ll want to speed up your counting, but if you stick to the numbers (or at least try to), and don’t take any breaks (in other words, consecutively repeat the 4-7-8 without resuming regular breathing), you can literally feel your heart rate slow down, your mind get quieter, and your whole body physically relax. It washes over you like a calming, relaxing drug. I can never remember getting past the first set of 4-7-8.

Do you know the feeling of being put under by anesthesia, where you are conscious, and the next thing you remember is waking up? That’s what this is like for me: As soon as I start the practice, the next thing I remember, I’m waking up in the morning and can’t even remember beginning the 4-7-8 count the night before. Crazy.

Now to the more technical details: People who are stressed or anxious are actually chronically under-breathing, because stressed people breathe shortly and shallowly, and often even unconsciously hold their breath. By extending your inhale to a count of four, you are forcing yourself to take in more oxygen, allowing the oxygen to affect your bloodstream by holding your breath for seven seconds, and then emitting carbon dioxide from your lungs by exhaling steadily for eight seconds. The technique will effectively slow your heart rate and increase oxygen in your bloodstream, and may even make you feel slightly lightheaded which contributes to the mild sedative-like effect. It will instantly relax your heart, mind, and overall central nervous system because you are controlling the breath versus continuing to breathe short, shallow gasps of air.

How it Can Work For You

Mindful breathing practices have been a part of yoga and Eastern wellness modalities for centuries, but aren’t as popular in Western culture. The most well-known champion of the 4-7-8 breathing technique in the U.S., who is somewhat responsible for the prevalence that the technique does have amongst integrative medicine practitioners, yogis, and those in search of stress reduction and overall relaxation, is Harvard-educated Dr. Andrew Weil.

Though I’m not promising or claiming (nor does Dr. Weil) that practicing this breathing technique can fight disease or provide clinical benefits, I can tell you one thing: If it affects you like it did me, it will help you fall asleep way faster. Not only is it free, it also works for a number of different instances. In addition to using it to fall asleep in a pinch, you can practice it if you wake up in the middle of the night and find yourself thinking about something you have to do the next day, in order to fall back asleep; if you are nervous before an event (like a wedding, or giving a speech); if you are angry about something and want to calm down. My friend (the bride-to-be who slept like a baby the week before her wedding), who gets nervous to fly, uses it before flights and during if the plane encounters turbulence.

It is now what I use to fall asleep every single night, and each morning, I’m amazed at how well it worked.

http://www.byrdie.com/how-to-fall-asleep-fast

The Entire Argument For Blaming Sexters, Destroyed In 1 Tweet

 

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Perhaps you have a friend who thinks all those celebrities whose nude photos were leaked on Sunday deserved what they got. “Anyone who doesn’t want their naked photos going public shouldn’t have ever taken them,” your theoretical friend argues.

Well, your friend surely wouldn’t feel the same way if someone hacked, say, his or her bank account instead of someone else’s iPhone. Or as The New York Times’ Farhad Manjoo put it…

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Originally published by Huffington Post

A Miracle On Live TV.. Oklahoma tornado 2013

Lonely elderly woman finds dog under rubble of her house live on air after tornado hit

Ang miracle minsan naman talaga eh anjan lang sa tabi-tabi. 

Explosions at the Boston Marathon

Be warned, this is intense,

I offer my prayers to the people injured in the Boston Marathon,

Jusme! Bomba levels and not in a Seiko way.

Unbelievable Little Kid Does a Trick Shot Video

Mejo challenge for me a ang pagdribble ng bola let alone ang pag shoot! May future tong batang to, itrain mo na to Coach Roach.

US Magazine Lists ‘Bwakaw’ as One of Best Undistributed Films in the World for 2012

A US-based arts and culture magazine has listed the Philippines’ official Oscar entry “Bwakaw” as one of this year’s “50 Best Undistributed Films of 2012” in a yearend survey of more than 120 film critics, journalists, film section editors, and past and present contributors worldwide.

Published by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Film Comment magazine annually releases the most comprehensive review of the year in film. Joining the film byJun Robles Lana in the top five films that made appearances at film festivals or special screenings worldwide, but remain undistributed, are Joachim Lafosse’s “Our Children,” Song Fang’s “Memories Look at Me,” Alan Berliner’s “First Cousin Once Removed,” andYing Liang’s “When Night Falls.”

Last October, “Bwakaw” was the only Asian film to make it to the prestigious list of TIME magazine’s “10 Films to Watch” at the 50th New York Film Festival, one of the world’s oldest and most anticipated film festivals organized by the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

Following its selection to the 8th Cinemalaya Philippine Independent Film Festival’s Directors’ Showcase category, “Bwakaw” has made rounds in various foreign film festivals such as in New York, Toronto, Hawaii and Tokyo where it garnered rave reviews from international film critics.

The bid of the film starring legendary actor Eddie Garcia to become the first ever Filipino film to be nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards gets a strong boost as it continues to get a favorable standing in the leading Oscar prediction site AwardsCircuit.com.

Meanwhile, the 83-year-old Garcia won Best Actor for his role in “Bwakaw” at the Asia Pacific Film Festival held in Macau last Saturday (December 15). His powerful portrayal of a grumpy, old, gay man who comes out late in life has been gaining international attention that fuels the movie’s hope to take home an Oscar. Several critics, including Joey Magidson of AwardsCircuit.com and Larry Rohter of The New York Times, have even echoed comparison of Garcia to veteran Hollywood actor Clint Eastwood.

– Starmometer

US Magazine Lists ‘Bwakaw’ as One of Best Undistributed Films in the World for 2012 : Starmometer.

Felix Baumgartner breaks the sound barrier during skydive from a record 24 miles up

Felix Baumgartner breaks the sound barrier during skydive from a record 24 miles up.

 

PH’s Oscar Entry ‘Bwakaw’ Makes It in TIME’s ’10 Films to Watch’ List : Starmometer

PH’s Oscar Entry ‘Bwakaw’ Makes It in TIME’s ’10 Films to Watch’ List : Starmometer.